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Parrot breeder, Macaw breeder, birds for sale, exotic parrots, Cockatoo breeder, Mccaw, Mc caw, Macaws, Cockatoo, Greenwing Macaw, Greenwing Macaws, Greenwinged Macaw, Blue and Gold Macaw, Blue and Gold Macaws, Hyacinth Macaw, Hyacinth Macaws, Cockatoos, parrots, parrot, Moluccan Cockatoos, mullucan, Rose-breasted Cockatoo, Rose breasted Cockatoos, Umbrella Cockatoo, Umbrella Cockatoos, aviary, aviaries, AFA, breeder, breeders, bird breeders, breeding, baby birds, baby parrots, pet birds, avian nutrition, birds diet, Avian Adventures Aviary
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Young  hyacinth enjoying
being on a swinging toy.
The hyacinth macaw, also known as the hyacinthine macaw, is the largest of all the macaws. They average about 42 inches in length with a wingspan of almost 4 feet. Their weight ranges from 1200 to 1700 grams. Hyacinths are spectacular birds with cobalt blue feathers, a black beak and yellow to light orange skin patches circling their dark, brown eyes and the edge of their lower mandibles.
In the wild, they live in small family groups except when feeding and roosting for the night. At these times, the hyacinths typically band together in flocks from 10 to 100 birds. They nest in hollow trunks of Manduvi trees in the Pantanal of South America and in trees and cliffs in certain areas of northeast Brazil. Hyacinths typically lay 1 to 3 white eggs. Sexual maturity is reached between 4 to 7 years of age. In all nesting areas, there has been severe habitat loss in the wild and the hyacinth macaw is on the endangered species list as a result.


 
Two young hyacinths sharing a friendly kiss.










Our companion hyacinth, Jack, in free flight during training sessions. 

Play session with Rita and two young hyacinths. 





Their huge beak is designed to open and eat hard palm nuts. The lower mandible acts as a chisel to split the nuts open and the upper mandible is used as a crushing surface. These palm nuts are so hard that a hammer is often unable to crack them open. Palm nuts consist of 50% saturated fat and are relatively low in protein content (9-11%). Commercially grown nuts such as almonds, filberts, walnuts, etc. are also 50% fat or more but the fat is typically either mono-unsaturated or poly-unsaturated fat. For this reason, it is critical for hyacinth macaws in captivity to be offered nuts which have relatively high proportions of saturated fat. These would be macadamias, brazils and fresh coconut meat which are more easily obtained than palm nuts. Hyacinths need a high fat (saturated), low protein diet.


This baby is just learning how to hold and play with toys. 
Baby hyacinth at 45 days of age waiting for his feeding. 






A domestic raised, well-socialized hyacinth is a joy to be with. They are gentle, playful, affectionate and highly intelligent companions. Hyacinths learn quickly and need a lot of stimulation, daily contact and interaction with their people to be happy. Highly social birds, they thrive on being handled and cuddled. Because they have no preening gland, it is vital for them to be bathed on a frequent, regular basis. Their very respectable beaks require a strong cage. A variety of wooden toys to chew on, including hard woods, are essential to their well being.
 
 
 
 
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